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Stopping the abuse of power through sexual exploitation

Toolkit

Stopping the abuse of power through sexual exploitation


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The International Association of Women Judges published an accessible toolkit in 2012: Stopping the abuse of power through sexual exploitation: Naming, shaming, and ending sextortion (PDF) to break the silence about the combination of sexual harassment, rape, and corruption that many women, girls and sometimes boys and men experience.

What the toolkit does

(copied from the toolkit)

  • Give the problem a name
    That effort starts with naming the phenomenon: sextortion. Without a name, the diverse circumstances in which sextortion occurs and the different legal theories under which it might be charged work to obscure the similarities among sextortion cases, masking the nature and extent of the problem and isolating the victims. Naming sextortion is the first step in shedding light on the problem. The Toolkit’s definition of sextortion gives us the common vocabulary needed to facilitate the discussion, analysis, data collection, coalition building, and action that will eventually lead to the changes in attitude and behaviour required to shame and end sextortion.

  • Identify existing legal provisions
    The existing legal and institutional framework for addressing sextortion will vary from country to country. The Toolkit explains how to identify the existing legal provisions in your country that might be used to prosecute sextortion.

  • Identify institutional and other barriers to effective prosecution
    An adequate legal framework is the first requirement for successful prosecution of sextortion, but it is not sufficient if the system for receiving complaints and protecting complainants is inadequate or if the existing institutional and budgetary framework lacks the capacity to support those prosecutions. The Toolkit also explains how to identify the barriers to effective prosecution that may exist in your country.

  • Formulate an action plan
    Assessing the existing legal and institutional framework for prosecuting sextortion will reveal both where the opportunities exist to take action to end sextortion and where the obstacles lie. Completing that assessment will allow you to make informed decisions about the steps that can be taken to address sextortion within your country’s existing framework and, where appropriate, the steps that may need to be taken to change that framework.

Toolkit sections

(copied from the toolkit)

  • What is sextortion?
    Defines the term “sextortion” and explains what distinguishes it from other types of sexually abusive conduct.
  • What you can do to combat sextortion
    Outlines steps that you can take to address sextortion in your country.
  • How to assess the legal framework for prosecuting sextortion
    Provides guidance about how to assess the adequacy of the existing national and international legal framework for prosecuting sextortion in your country.
  • How to assess the institutional framework for prosecuting sextortion
    Offers guidance about how to assess whether the institutional framework in your country has the capacity to support successful prosecution of sextortion. Focuses on the procedural, social, and other barriers that may thwart efforts to combat sextortion.
  • Changing attitudes, changing behaviour
    Discusses what it will take to shame and end sextortion.
  • Frequently asked questions
    Asks and answers basic questions about the meaning and use of the term “sextortion.”
  • Appendix of resources
    Contains information about where to find resources to help you take steps to combat sextortion, including:
  1. Getting started checklist
  2. Initial consultation for naming, shaming, and ending sextortion
  3. Checklist of existing laws
  4. Checklist of barriers to enforcing the law
  5. People, agencies, and organisations that could provide professional expertise, financial assistance, or institutional support for efforts to combat sextortion
  6. Written materials on sextortion, sexual exploitation, and corruption.

Stopping the abuse of power through sexual exploitation: Naming, shaming, and ending sextortion (PDF)

    Disclaimer


    All views in this text are the author(s)’, and may differ from the U4 partner agencies’ policies.

    This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)