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Anti-corruption measures for locally led climate actions

Climate change interventions (i.e., mitigation and adaptation actions) are put at risk by corruption. Locally led climate actions involving actors on the ‘frontlines of climate change’ tend to be context specific and yield higher returns. Anti-corruption tools give climate change practitioners a better chance to deliver successful climate mitigation and adaptation projects. Such measures include enabling access to information on key subjects to the community, effective monitoring of projects by local leaders, setting up robust complaints mechanisms and whistleblower protection strategies.

31 October 2021
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Main points

  • Locally led climate actions are particularly important as they are informed by first-hand local knowledge which is foundational to designing and implementing successful adaptation strategies.
  • Anti-corruption tools give climate change practitioners a better chance to deliver successful climate mitigation and adaptation projects.
  • Illustrative anti-corruption measures that can be applied to locally led climate actions include but are not limited to encouraging public participation, using social accountability tools, streamlining climate finance, and focusing on monitoring, learning and evaluation (MEL), amongst others.
  • Locally led climate actions need to consider voices of vulnerable groups and recognise appropriate focus areas for interventions from the start to be effective.

Cite this publication


Rahman, K.; (2021) Anti-corruption measures for locally led climate actions. Bergen: U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Helpdesk Answer 2021:24)

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About the author

Kaunain received her Master's in Corruption and Governance from The Centre for the Study of Corruption at the University of Sussex in the UK where her focus area of research was corruption in international business. She works as Research Coordinator at Transparency International (TI), and her main responsibilities lie with the Anti-Corruption Helpdesk.

Disclaimer


All views in this text are the author(s)’, and may differ from the U4 partner agencies’ policies.

This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Keywords


anti-corruption measures, anti-corruption tools, climate change